samskeyti

Jul 26 2014
pixography:

Magritte ~ “The Traveler”, 1937

pixography:

Magritte ~ “The Traveler, 1937

(via onehundreddollars)

1,594 notes

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I Am Woman, Hear My Thoughts and Decisions Be Regularly Criticized

1 note

Jul 21 2014
drolldrumroll:

Pinwheel 6 is live and receiving a lot of love. This makes me a VERY happy editor. Pinwheel would be lost in the woods without its staff: Dolly Lemke, Holly Amos, Mike Krutel, & Thomas Patrick Levy. 
The issue features fearless artwork by Devan Shimoyama, a recent MFA graduate from the Yale University School of Art, and poems/colossuses by: James Shea, Jane Wong, Natalie Eilbert, Carrie Lorig, Mark Leidner, JoAnna Novak, Kelin Loe, Sampson Starkweather, Amy King, Alina Gregorian, Hannah Kucharzak, Amanda Smeltz, Mark Cugini, Emily Toder, Dawn Sueoka, BJ Love, Jen Tynes, & Ellen Welcker.

On my list.

drolldrumroll:

Pinwheel 6 is live and receiving a lot of love. This makes me a VERY happy editor. Pinwheel would be lost in the woods without its staff: Dolly Lemke, Holly Amos, Mike Krutel, & Thomas Patrick Levy. 

The issue features fearless artwork by Devan Shimoyama, a recent MFA graduate from the Yale University School of Art, and poems/colossuses by: James SheaJane WongNatalie EilbertCarrie LorigMark LeidnerJoAnna NovakKelin LoeSampson StarkweatherAmy KingAlina GregorianHannah KucharzakAmanda SmeltzMark CuginiEmily ToderDawn SueokaBJ LoveJen Tynes, & Ellen Welcker.

On my list.

5 notes

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A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up.

Stephen Scobie, on the Naropa Institute’s 1994 tribute to Allen Ginsberg (via fuckyeahbeatniks)

#LOOK AT THE FUCKING BELL JAR

(via talkwordytome)

Yes.

(via tracydimond)

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The most terrible thing about pornography is that it tells male truth. The most insidious thing about pornography is that it tells male truth as if it were universal truth. Those depictions of women in chains being tortured are supposed to represent our deepest erotic aspirations. And some of us believe it, don’t we? The most important thing about pornography is that the values in it are the common values of men. This is the crucial fact that both the male Right and the male Left, in their differing but mutually reinforcing ways, want to keep hidden from women. The male Right wants to hide the pornography, and the male Left wants to hide its meaning. Both want access to pornography so that men can be encouraged and energized by it. The Right wants secret access; the Left wants public access. But whether we see the pornography or not, the values expressed in it are the values expressed in the acts of rape and wife-beating, in the legal system, in religion, in art and in literature, in systematic economic discrimination against women, in the moribund academies, and by the good and wise and kind and enlightened in all of these fields and areas. Pornography is not a genre of expression separate and different from the rest of life; it is a genre of expression fully in harmony with any culture in which it flourishes. This is so whether it is legal or illegal. And, in either case, pornography functions to perpetuate male supremacy and crimes of violence against women because it conditions, trains, educates, and inspires men to despise women, to use women, to hurt women. Pornography exists because men despise women, and men despise women in part because pornography exists.
— Andrea Dworkin, Letters From A War Zone (via mahakavi)

(via mrsdalloway)

281 notes

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At a lecture I was giving in a large West Coast university in the Spring of 2008, the female students talked extensively about how much they preferred to have a completely waxed pubic area as it made them feel “clean,” “hot” and “well groomed.” As they excitedly insisted that they themselves chose to have a Brazilian wax, one student let slip that her boyfriend had complained when she decided to give up on waxing. Then there was silence. I asked the student to say more about her boyfriend’s preferences and how she felt about his criticism. As she started to speak other students joined in, only now the conversation took a very different turn. The excitement in the room gave way to a subdued discussion on how some boyfriends had even refused to have sex with non-waxed girlfriends as they “looked gross.” One student told the group how her boyfriend bought her a waxing kit for Valentine’s Day, while yet another sent out an email to his friends joking about his girlfriend’s “hairy beaver.” No, she did not break up with him, she got waxed instead.

Two weeks after the waxing discussion, I was at an East Coast Ivy League school where some female students became increasingly angry. They accused me of denying them free choice in their embracing of our hypersexualized porn culture, and being the next generation’s elite women, this idea was especially repugnant because they saw no limits or constraints on them as women. Literally two minutes later, one of the students made a joke about the “trick” that many of them employ as a way to avoid hookup sex. What is this trick? These women purposely don’t shave or wax as they are getting ready to go out that night so they will feel too embarrassed to participate in hookup sex. As she spoke, I watched as others nodded their heads in agreement. When I asked why they couldn’t just say no to sex, they informed me that once you have a few drinks in you, and are at a party or a bar, it is too hard to say no. I was speechless, not least because they had just been arguing that I had denied them agency in my discussion of porn culture, and yet they saw no contradiction in telling me that they didn’t have the agency to say no to sex. The next day I flew to Utah to give a lecture in a small college, which although not a religious college, had a good percentage of Mormons and Catholics. I told them about the lecture the previous night and asked them if they knew what the trick was. It turns out that trick is everywhere, including Utah.

I tell this story because, on many levels, it neatly captures how the porn culture is affecting young women’s lives. The reality is that women don’t need to look at porn to be profoundly affected by it because images, representations, and messages of porn are now delivered to women via pop culture. Women today are still not major consumers of hard-core porn; they are, however, whether they know it or not, internalizing porn ideology, an ideology that often masquerades as advice on how to be hot, rebellious, and cool in order to attract (and hopefully keep) a man. An excellent example is genital waxing, which first became popular in porn (not least because it makes the women look pre-pubescent) and then filtered down into women’s media such as Cosmopolitan, a magazine that regularly features stories and tips on what “grooming” methods women should adopt to attract a man. Sex and the City, that hugely successful show with an almost cult following, also used waxing as a storyline. For instance, in the movie, Miranda is chastised by Samantha for “letting herself go” by having pubic hair.

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Academics have developed complicated theories and obscure jargon in an effort to describe what is now referred to as structural racism, yet the concept is fairly straightforward. One theorist, Iris Marion Young, relying on a famous “birdcage” metaphor, explains it this way: If one thinks about racism by examining only one wire of the cage, or one form of disadvantage, it is difficult to understand how and why the bird is trapped. Only a large number of wires arranged in a specific way, and connected with one another, serve to enclose the bird and ensure it cannot escape.

What is particularly important to keep in mind is that any given wire of the cage may or may not be specifically developed for the purpose of trapping the bird, yet it still operates (together with other wires) to restrict its freedom.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow  (via ceedling)

(Source: newwavefeminism, via mrsdalloway)

5,674 notes

Jul 09 2014
homesteadilee:

williamcrisafi:

Meeting above the fog dipped pines Bill Crisafi (please do not remove credit) Billcrisafi.bigcartel.com

homesteadilee:

williamcrisafi:

Meeting above the fog dipped pines
Bill Crisafi (please do not remove credit)
Billcrisafi.bigcartel.com

(Source: , via onehundreddollars)

1,028 notes

Jul 05 2014
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